Mobile & Wireless

Mobile & Wireless Security

Due to a security flaw in the Samsung Galaxy S3 your phones data can be wipe just by surfing web pages (on a compromised website). Hackers have become aware of this security flaw and they are placing hidden code in webpages that will trigger the remote wipe feature of this phone without the permission or any input from the phones user. This code is presently circulating online through websites but it’s also possible that attackers may adopt the code to a test message distribution method, QR code or NFC tag.

Other reports on the internet are saying that they have uncovered more codes built into Samsung devices that could be used in other attacks like killing the phones SIM card. Beside claim we have not seen any evidence of such code yet.

It is also believed that this code may also trigger a factory reset on Galaxy S2 and other Samsung devices that use Samsung's "TouchWiz" interface.

How to Protect you self for this issue:
Backup you Smart Phone content, and check regularly on the Samsung website to see if they have released an update to fix your phone.
The only way to guard against the attacks is to switch off "service loading" in settings, and disable QR code and NFC apps.

How to Test your Phone
You can test your phone by entering any one of the two codes provide here:

*2767*688#
or
*2767*2878#

Please make BACKUP of your all data on your phone before use this code because it you phone is vulnerable the code will wipe all data on your phone and reset it back to factory default.

Devices from other Android manufacturers appear to be unaffected
 

More and more people own internet-ready mobile devices, which without you realising it can increasing your exposure to cyber and real-life criminals.

Did you know that the  GPS functions on many smart phones that allow you to tell your friends where you are via website like Facebook can also tell criminals where you are so that they know when you are out it they are planning to burgle you home.

A survey conducted by the Ponemon Institute on behalf of ACVG says that mobile phone users in the US are lax on mobile phone security.  Nearly  84 percent of those surveyed use the same phone for both business and personal matters.  Many people also make purchases over their mobile phones.  Few consumers use phone-locking passwords and many use the same password for multiple apps.

 

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Attackers have infected over 1 million cell phones in China with a malware virus. The virus sends out text messages automatically. When the malware infects the phones, it sends out information about the infected device SIM cards to the attackers. With the SIM information, the hacker can remotely send messages from the infected mobile phones.

The criminal behind this virus appear to be using this as way to make money because the phones are texting premium-rate numbers.

The virus spreads by texting everyone in the user’s phone book. So far it has been estimates that this virus has cost users over €220,000 Euro